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Top Dives In The Bahamas

Divers in The Bahamas are spoilt for choice. The islands cater for all levels of experience and divers can choose from relaxed shallow dives, thrilling drift dives and shark and dolphin encounters. Here's a selection of some of the best sites... 

Tiger Beach

Tiger Beach

Island: Grand Bahama Island

This fairly new dive site shot up to number one of the list of The Bahamas most popular dive sites within no time. Local operators take divers out for what has been voted to be the best shark dive in the world: A close interaction with a group of resident tiger sharks. Divers gather in a circle on the sandy bottom at 20 metres where a shark handler feeds these impressive sharks, skilfully positioning them to allow underwater photographers to get memorable shots. Lemon sharks, Caribbean reef sharks and nurse sharks usually join the feeding frenzy.


 

Theo's wreck

Theos wreck

Island: Grand Bahama Island

The 80m-long freighter was purposely sunk in 1982 and now rests at 30m on the edge of the oceanic shelf. The vessel is covered in yellow and orange cup corals, large gorgonians and red sponges and over the past three decades a vast array of marine life has moved in: schools of jacks, snappers and grunts are as common as colourful parrotfish and butterflyfish. Divers can enter the engine rooms and cargo holds through various entry points – look out for the resident green moray that inhabits the wreck. Sea turtles, reef sharks and spotted dolphins are known to pay the wreck regular visits.


 

Current Cut

CurrentCut

Island: Eleuthera & Harbour Island

If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush outside the shark dives, The Bahamas’ most famous drift dive won’t let you down. The team of Valentine’s Dive Centre will drop you off at the entry point and rapid current takes you on a ride whizzing through the 1km long channel. Spotted eagle rays, stingrays, blacktip reef sharks, turtles, nurse sharks, even bull sharks are often seen. While the variety of macro life in the channel is abundant, the exhilarating ride ends after only 10 minutes and doesn’t allow for much time for critter spotting. On the upside: The dive boat will pick you up at the exit of the channel only to take you back to the entry for another two laps.


 

Over the Wall

Hole in the wall

Island: Andros

Over-the-wall is a great day dive but you would not want to miss this dive at night. The dive takes you over the ledge of The Bahamas’ greatest wall plummeting to 1,820m into the Tongue of the Ocean. On your descend all divers switch off their torches. Once your eyes have adjusted to the darkness you will see bioluminescent dinoflagellates light up everywhere. The high concentration of these marine plankton particles produces a special light show that divers will enjoy during their ascend. At 20m the torches are being switched back on and divers have time to explore the wall on their way to the surface.


 

Great hammerhead shark feed

hammerheads

Island: Bimini

Between January and April, great hammerheads aggregate off the shore of Bimini. Close encounters with this usually shy species are almost guaranteed during this time. The team of the Neal Watson Dive Centre were the first ones to discover the aggregation in 2003 and have established one of the best great hammerhead dives in the northern hemisphere. The elusive sharks have become accustomed to the regular feeding ritual and once they arrive, they tend to stick around for a few hours, expectantly circling the clear waters of the unnamed dive site. A group of no more than 10 divers is taken on a five-minute boat ride to the shallow dive site to get close and cosy with the 6m long sharks. Although other shark species tend to avoid great hammerheads, bull sharks are occasionally seen during the feed. The dive is specifically designed for underwater photographers and allows for some amazing close-up shots.


 

Mt Olympus

Olympus

Island: Grand Bahama Island

The peak of this over 450m tall coral-encrusted underwater pinnacle stands off the shore of Grand Bahama. Although this site is best explored as a deep or technical dive, the peak of the pinnacle reaches 18m where there is plenty to see. Sharks, sea turtles and dolphins often visit the site.


 

MV Comberbach

Island: Long Island

The Comberbach was prepared for divers before it was purposely sunk by the Stella Maris Resort in 1986. The wreck of the former British steel freighter sits upright in 27m of water and is overgrown in colourful coral and sponges. Marine life has claimed the artificial reef as habitat including dozens of blacktip reef sharks.


 

Dean’s Blue hole

Island: Long Island

Blue holes are one of The Bahamas’ most distinctive features - hundreds of them are scattered across the islands. Dean’s Blue Hole is the world’s deepest blue hole on record, plunging to about 202m. The site has gained popularity with freedivers in particular who use the site as a training spot for competitions. The excellent visibility (15-30m year round) and the lack of strong currents make Dean’s Blue Hole an easily accessible shore dive. Plenty of reef fish, grunts and snappers are found here as well as the occasional sea turtle.

 

Hole in the Wall

Over the wall 

Island: Andros

The Hole in the Wall site was first discovered some 25 years ago by Archie Forfar, a cave diver who tragically died a few years later when attempting to set the new record for the deepest scuba dive. Only in 1993, a team of divers of the Small Hope Bay Lodge rediscovered the site. Technical divers can descend to 61m (200ft) where a hole leads into a large, well-lit cavern.

main id 4c newislands teardrop IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE BAHAMAS TOURIST OFFICE

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